"White feminists like Michelle Cottle and Linda Hirshman want Michelle Obama to “Lean In” — to be more like Sheryl Sandberg. (Even though the entire “Lean In” brand of feminism is for middle- and upper-class white women and doesn’t speak to women of color’s reality.)

But Cottle didn’t get that memo. She just can’t believe that an “overeducated lawyer” like Michelle Obama would waste her time caring for her kids – how anti-”having it all” of her!”

"This wasn’t about spectatorship – this was sheer objectification. You took a person who was potentially having a hard time – you don’t even mention her again after acknowledging she paused after downward dog, nor do you mention if/how she finished the class, how compassionate – and made her the object of your emotions; this thing that caused you to cry because of all these big thoughts and feelings. How embarrassing it must be to show millions of people that you’ve never given this much thought to the world surrounding your trikonasana before a fat, black woman entered it. I truly feel for you.”

"In 1970, in a contribution to Notes from the Second Year, titled “Woman and Her Mind,” Meredith Tax argued that the condition of women constituted a state of “female schizophrenia”—a realm of unreality where a woman either belonged to a man or was “nowhere, disappeared, teetering on the edge of a void with no work to do and no felt identity at all.” By mid-century, Elaine Showalter noted, in “The Female Malady” (1985), scores of literary and journalistic works had defined schizophrenia as a “bitter metaphor” for the “cultural situation” of women. It was this state of affairs that the radical feminists had set out to change, only to find themselves doubly alienated. The first alienation was a by-product of their political vision: radical insight can resemble the mind-set described by the clinical psychologist Louis Sass, in “Madness and Modernism” (1992), when he wrote that the schizophrenic is “acutely aware of the inauthenticities and compromises of normal social existence.” The second alienation was tragic: alienation from one another.”

An exhibit about the women who lived in Labrador at the Mission to Deep Sea Fishermen where my great-grandparents worked from 1910-1913.

This virtual exhibit portrays the women who lived and worked in the coastal communities of Newfoundland and Labrador prior to Confederation. Before joining Canada in 1949 the Dominion of Newfoundland was made up of hundreds of small outports, sustained by an inshore, household-based fishery. In a diversity of ways, women were viewed as the backbone of this industry. Equally diverse, we hope, are the archival images, sound clips and documents drawn together in this exhibit. These were gathered with the help and resources of many women and men. This includes the work of early photographers both amateur and professional, the stories left behind by diarists and faithful letter writers, the merchant’s story told through meticulous bookkeeping files, profiles written in community newspapers, students who returned to their home communities with tape recorders and carefully crafted questions to ask their mothers, uncles, aunts and grandparents about life before Confederation. childrenFinally, this exhibit is a celebration of archives and the work of archivists, and also the people who recognized the importance of the photos, letters, files and diaries that came into their possession, through chance or inheritance, and who made the choice to deposit and preserved these gems of history, to share with the rest of us.

The caretaker of the hotel Nello Summertimes in Southampton says he has seen and heard ghosts on the property.

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by Meghan O’Rourke

On Sunday, July 21st, the NPR host Scott Simon’s mother entered the I.C.U. at a Chicago hospital, following a surgery. She died on Monday night, at the age of eighty-four. In the week before her death, Simon began live-tweeting his mother’s final days to his almost 1.3 million followers from her hospital room. The tweets were poignant and haunting, and have brought Simon—already a mini-celebrity—a new level of renown. Total strangers read what he wrote and responded deeply.

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