Halsey House | Southampton | 2014

Halsey House | Southampton | 2014

Parrish Art Museum, Sputhampton

Parrish Art Museum, Sputhampton

Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venezia

Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venezia

Pretty is as pretty does.

Kitchen at the Camp is done. #thecolorofsummer

Before & After

Outdoor camp shower constructed with treated lumber, white marble rock, reclaimed limestone pavers, slate, and assorted found materials.

Mommy Camp, Day Two: The colors of summer.

Given the somewhat outrageous cost of day camps on the East End of Long Island, the kids this summer are instead spending a few weeks of Mommy Camp. Activities for Day 1 included: a short scholastic review in their summer workbooks, free time (primarily in the form of a game of baseball), belated Father’s Day card making, a little Kindle time (the Lego movie for the 100th time cause #everythingisawesome), digging the new shower, shovel tag (while Mommy spray-painted the patio furniture), bike riding, and tie-dying t-shirts!

Re-painting the kitchen at Camp. #mintgreenbegone #whilesoloparenting

Re-painting the kitchen at Camp. #mintgreenbegone #whilesoloparenting

Tornado Alley |

Last week, my littlest turned four and I sat with him, snotty-nosed, in my lap at the hair salon as his long curling clumps of soft blonde hair slid down my leg, falling in piles at my feet.

Thick, voluminous clouds dropping above the heavy green fields and forests. Everything here, soy, wheat, hay, sunflower fields, is wet. Flush and greedy, like the color of money. Rain pooling along the fence line, crop line, skyline. Evergreen trees growing up out of streams. Water in the treads along the side of the highway. Tides rushing over the gleaming Kentucky Dam. In the news, more shooters. More shootings. More dying and more dead. As though there’s a war on here. In the air, weathered old telephone poles, cell towers, gray clouds, sin.  A lone heron lifting up from the water drenched ditch. The speed of summer is meant to be slow, but thanks to air conditioning, and irrigation, convenience shops, we speed, soggy, swamping, soaking it up. 

A flatbed of cars, crushed for recycling, expectant, like having a handful of cards yet to be played, like right before the tractor trailer upturns in the ditch outside Paducah.

Tornado Alley |

Last week, my littlest turned four and I sat with him, snotty-nosed, in my lap at the hair salon as his long curling clumps of soft blonde hair slid down my leg, falling in piles at my feet.

Thick, voluminous clouds dropping above the heavy green fields and forests. Everything here, soy, wheat, hay, sunflower fields, is wet. Flush and greedy, like the color of money. Rain pooling along the fence line, crop line, skyline. Evergreen trees growing up out of streams. Water in the treads along the side of the highway. Tides rushing over the gleaming Kentucky Dam. In the news, more shooters. More shootings. More dying and more dead. As though there’s a war on here. In the air, weathered old telephone poles, cell towers, gray clouds, sin. A lone heron lifting up from the water drenched ditch. The speed of summer is meant to be slow, but thanks to air conditioning, and irrigation, convenience shops, we speed, soggy, swamping, soaking it up.

A flatbed of cars, crushed for recycling, expectant, like having a handful of cards yet to be played, like right before the tractor trailer upturns in the ditch outside Paducah.

A self-possessed little girl named Jacqueline Bouvier walking with her pony. Diana Vreeland wearing striped shorts with matching striped earrings. Gary Cooper impeccably dressed in a sport jacket and trousers as he enters a fashionable beach club. These are among the 30 black-and-white images of the rich and famous in “Southampton Blue Book, 1930 to 1960: Photographs by Bert Morgan,” on view at the Rogers Mansion of the Southampton Historical Museums and Research Center through Oct. 18.